Classical snobs

Discussion in 'Music and Recordings' started by Claritas, Sep 29, 2015.

  1. Claritas

    Claritas Friend

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  2. sorrodje

    sorrodje Carla Bruni's other lover - Friend

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    Seems you're alone my friend ... ;-)))
     
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  3. lm4der

    lm4der A very good sport - Friend

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    We're all friends, you can tell by the "Friend" designation under the avatars.
    <opens door and quietly let's himself out...>
     
  4. lm4der

    lm4der A very good sport - Friend

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  5. knerian

    knerian Friend

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    Yes, us higher beings need to congregate in this thread. Please post your latest listening experience.

     
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  6. skank

    skank Friend

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    The classical piece I listen to most is Mozart's K622 (Clarinet Concerto) along with matching Quintet.

    It's also the one I have the most recordings of.

    Always uplifting - never stressful - not overly dynamic so it can be enjoyed in the car.
     
  7. burnspbesq

    burnspbesq Friend

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    You may ultimately decide that you don't like it, but you should give this a careful and objective listen.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Klasse

    Klasse Friend

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    This is quite nice:
    Vivaldi: Les Quatre Saisons & Autres Concertos / Amadine Beyer, Gli Incogniti
     
  9. pedalhead

    pedalhead Friend

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    I'm not a classical snob (I'm a jazz snob), but would quite like to be..am I allowed in here? ;) I know precisely nothing about classical music, but I do enjoy a bit now & again. Would a classical snob care to give a few pointers on where to start please? I think I tend to favour strings and the less pompous flavour of classical. Can of worms I'm sure! Cheers!
     
  10. skank

    skank Friend

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    Vivaldi Four Seasons is a good place to start.

    You've probably heard a good bit of it in commercials, jingles, sound tracks, etc..

    Quartets and Quintets are another good place to start.

    Pick an instrument you don't find grating and look there - Your strings will be in the background behind the solos.

    For me, I have to really be in the mood to listen to something like French Horn solos for 45 minutes straight, but everyone's different.

    I also find that like most music it's mood dependent.

    I also find that it's beneficial to listen enough times in order to learn the piece. It's better (for me) to know what's coming next. This is easier with simpler pieces. You wouldn't try to digest a Steve Vai or Artisticrats album for the first time all in one sitting - would you?

    I buy most of my classical CD's at either GoodWill or Hospice (Thrift Stores) for usually a $1.00 or $1.25.

    I don't think people realize how stressful classical music can be because there's an assumption that it's boring. Listen to some Symphonies and you'll find your heart racing - not good if you're looking to unwind or do something demanding at work.

    Enjoy the journey!
     
  11. lm4der

    lm4der A very good sport - Friend

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    Yeah, I 2nd that. The four seasons is wonderful and easy. Also, try Bach Brandenburg concertos, number 3 and number 6. I think they go down easy, and you've probably heard no 3 before. It was used in the first Die Hard movie (the small string ensemble playing for the party). I still listen to those Vivaldi and Bach pieces regularly.

    Also, classical music works because the melodies evolve during the course of the piece - so you really do need to hear a given piece at least a few times so that you can learn how it builds, and then you get really sucked in and moved by it the more you hear it. Good pieces like this almost can't get boring, they just get better.

    Beethoven symphonies are also great to start with. There's a reason the 5th symphony is known by everyone. It's so powerful. I find the 3rd, 5th, and 7th super easy and powerful.
     
  12. zerodeefex

    zerodeefex Grumpiest admin

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    Been going through the 150 well kept mozart vinyl recordings my wife recently inherited. I'll post up some of my favorites as they come up.
     
  13. burnspbesq

    burnspbesq Friend

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    Adding to the list of places to start.

    Bach: solo suites for cello, The Well Tempered Clavier, The Art of Fugue, The St. Matthew and St. John Passions (some of the best choral music of all time), and the B Minor Mass.

    Mozart: I'm in the minority that dismisses Mozart as shallow ear candy, but the late symphonies and the operas can be pretty wonderful in the right hands.

    Beethoven: In addition to the symphonies, the piano sonatas, the string quartets, and the Triple Concerto (for piano, violin, cello and orchestra).

    Schubert: The song cycles Die Winterreise and Die Schone Mullein are some of the best vocal writing of all time. I'm partial to the recordings by the late German baritone Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau.

    Some great pieces you've probably heard often without knowing what they were: Richard Strauss' symphonic pieces Also Sprach Zarathustra and Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks; The Dvorak Ninth Symphony and Cello Concerto; Stravinsky's symphonic pieces The Rite of Spring and The Firebird; Tchaikovsky's Piano Concerto No. 1; Debussy's symphonic pieces A L'Apres-Midi d'une Faune and La Mer; Bartok's Concerto for Orchestra; Orff's Carmina Burana.

    I'm heavily into 20th and 21st Century classical music, which makes me a bit unusual. I love Shostakovich's symphonies and string quartets, Prokofiev's symphonies, the Ives "Concord" sonata for piano, the Bartok string quartets, the Lutoslawski symphonies, Part's choral music, pretty much anything by Hindemith or Poulenc, the Golijov St. Mark Passion, Reich's Music for 18 Musicians, Riley's In C, and most of John Adams' (not to be confused with John Luther Adams) orchestral works.

    Opera deserves a thread all its own.
     
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  14. lm4der

    lm4der A very good sport - Friend

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    Yeah, I consider these semi advanced. You sir are a connoisseur.
     
  15. Dr Pan K

    Dr Pan K Friend

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    Poulenc, eh? This is part of my crown jewels collection

    [​IMG]
     
  16. Claritas

    Claritas Friend

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    There are many wonderful, light-hearted classical pieces including:

    Handel's Water Music

    [​IMG]

    Haydn's Trumpet Concerto

    [​IMG]

    Schubert's "Trout" Quintet

    [​IMG]
     
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  17. NoStream

    NoStream Acquaintance

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    Speaking of Also Sprach Zarathustra, I've been listening to a lovely binaural recording of it lately. Easy piece to like plus binaural audio from the Neumann KU100.

    [​IMG]
     
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  18. Falcor

    Falcor Rando

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    Hi guys, First post here for me.

    Here are two recordings of the 4 seasons for you to try out. I usually find most recordings of 4 seasons too soft, and mellow (without any bite where it needs it). I particularly love the second recording. I often return to this description as it best describes, to me, how it should sound and the images the music should evoke.
    " "Winter" is peppered with silvery staccato notes from the high strings, calling to mind icy rain, whereas "Summer" evokes a thunderstorm in its final movement, which is why the movement is often dubbed "Storm." "

    I find the second recording does this extremely well.
     
  19. Dr Pan K

    Dr Pan K Friend

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    Heard Fabio Biondi perform the 4 seasons with Europa Galante ensemble and they were out of this world good. Biondi himself is a true master of Italian baroque music. Excellent recommendation
     
  20. knerian

    knerian Friend

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    Actually adding to burnspbesq, entry into classical can be different for everyone and doesnt need to start in the 17th or 18th century. Some can start with the 20th century stuff because it really closely resembles movie music which everyone is familiar with, so even Stravinsky, Mahler, Ravel, Prokofiev, Shostakovich is not too much of a stretch or challenge to start off with.

    Some people will tell you what version, performer, etc to get for maximum artistic transcendental orgasmic experience, if you are just starting out it doesn't matter at all as long as it is recorded decently, and older recordings from the 50 and 60s can sound really good even now. It's more time effective to get to know a piece and decide if you like it before looking for that Glenn Gould bootleg from the 1973 Ghana tour.
     

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