Bread

Discussion in 'Food and Drink' started by mitochondrium, Mar 14, 2020.

  1. mitochondrium

    mitochondrium Friend

    Friend
    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2017
    Likes Received:
    606
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Location:
    A Cell
    Nah, it is the best sign that your bread is not industrial fare. Such is Randy’s bread.
     
    noobtaylor likes this.
  2. randytsuch

    randytsuch Almost "Made"

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2017
    Likes Received:
    178
    Dislikes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Los Angeles, Ca
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Adjusted recipe. This is the third one, second was a little small.
     
    noobtaylor likes this.
  3. pechelman

    pechelman Acquaintance

    Contributor
    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2019
    Likes Received:
    54
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    In the past month there have been a few batches of ciabatta, a go at bagels (with a bit too strong of a lye solution), and french bread. Also the house has gotten a 15x18x.375" baking steel for the oven...man that thing is heavy. Started a rye sourdough starter yesterday, we'll see how it goes...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2020
    bixby, noobtaylor and mitochondrium like this.
  4. mitochondrium

    mitochondrium Friend

    Friend
    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2017
    Likes Received:
    606
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Location:
    A Cell
    welcome to the club have fun!
     
  5. randytsuch

    randytsuch Almost "Made"

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2017
    Likes Received:
    178
    Dislikes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Los Angeles, Ca
    Pizza night, 2nd time that I made the dough. Just flour water oil salt and yeast.

    Cheap and relatively easy
    Used red pasta and Alfredo sauce. Mozzarella cheese. Lots of mushrooms they shrink a lot. Broccoli and meatballs. Added about a clove of garlic too

    First time I rolled the dough too thin and this time it was too thick. Hopefully next time I'll get it right. Baked on a pizza stone

    Pic of leftovers. Looked better out of the oven but was too busy eating to take a pic lol
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2020
  6. pechelman

    pechelman Acquaintance

    Contributor
    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2019
    Likes Received:
    54
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    Thanks! I think I was fortunate enough to have a severe case of beginner's luck but I don't care. Really pleased with the results. Used 250g bread flour, 50g spelt, and 25g medium rye with an 80% total hydration. Used a colander for proofing since I don't yet have a nice banneton. The spots are kinda fun anyway.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2020
  7. mitochondrium

    mitochondrium Friend

    Friend
    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2017
    Likes Received:
    606
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Location:
    A Cell
    Unfortunately I can‘t See the picture
     
  8. pechelman

    pechelman Acquaintance

    Contributor
    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2019
    Likes Received:
    54
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    not sure what happened, was working yesterday i thought.
    anyway, checked it on an incognito window and all is good, hopefully fixed
     
  9. mitochondrium

    mitochondrium Friend

    Friend
    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2017
    Likes Received:
    606
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Location:
    A Cell
    woah, that looks nice, I like the big pores, gives a nice texture. How do you get away with 80 % hydration (I guess that means the amount of water you add is 80 % of the weight of the dry stuff ) and your bread still retains its shape so nicely with those big pores? Ijust calculated, I also use 80 % hydration with roughly 60 % rye/40 % einkorn wheat (both wholegrain) and end up with smaller pores and flatter bread. Congrats!
     
  10. pechelman

    pechelman Acquaintance

    Contributor
    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2019
    Likes Received:
    54
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    Thanks! I've been following this technique.

    You are correct about hydration being calculated based on a percentage of the flour. Starter is 20% and salt is 2%. Makes measuring and scaling the recipe easy.

    With more whole grain flour it will be much harder to develop an open crumb, especially with rye which has so little gluten protein to be able to capture fermentation gases and steam during baking. The second loaf I baked definitely wasn't as nice. I think I under proofed a bit since it was a little denser in between the larger pockets that were still present. Have my third loaf going right now and planning to bake tomorrow for dinner. Hopefully better this time.
     
  11. randytsuch

    randytsuch Almost "Made"

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2017
    Likes Received:
    178
    Dislikes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Los Angeles, Ca
    Based on my quick calcs, 80% water for the amounts below means 1625g of water.
    Figured by calculating 325 is 20% of total.
    Is that right?

     
  12. pechelman

    pechelman Acquaintance

    Contributor
    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2019
    Likes Received:
    54
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    Baker's Percentages are a little odd but start to make sense when you think about flour being the center of their universe. Where it gets more confusing is when you also have to consider the starter which is 50/50 flour/water, or as they say, 100% hydration. The formula I used called for 20% starter in relation to the amount of flour.

    In other more simpler words, if a recipe formula has a total amount of flour of 1000g, then an 80% hydration dough would be made by using 800g of water. Further, if the formula also calls for 2% salt, then it needs 20g of salt.
     
  13. mitochondrium

    mitochondrium Friend

    Friend
    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2017
    Likes Received:
    606
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Location:
    A Cell
    Thanks fit the recipe. That explains where those nice pores come from. It is basically worked like a typical dough. I have tried that in the past (with less success than you). I am also a little bit lazy. That is why I prefer the way of the German Schwarzbrot, which I admit it is an acquired taste. No autolysis, no need to work (folding) etc. Luckily I like its taste very much. Yours looks like a perfect breakfast bread.
     
  14. pechelman

    pechelman Acquaintance

    Contributor
    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2019
    Likes Received:
    54
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    A traditional German rye is on my list to make. Would you be willing to share your recipe?

    There's a bit of handling over a number of hours but really only about 30 minutes of actual work. It's nice being at home for work to be able to do these things, but this will likely only be a weekend thing when life returns to normal.
     
  15. randytsuch

    randytsuch Almost "Made"

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2017
    Likes Received:
    178
    Dislikes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Los Angeles, Ca
    Thanks for the reply

    Makes a lot more sense now lol

    My white bread is about 70% hydration using that method.
     
    pechelman likes this.
  16. mitochondrium

    mitochondrium Friend

    Friend
    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2017
    Likes Received:
    606
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Location:
    A Cell
    You need a rye based sourdough starter (50:50) and a wheat based sourdough starter (100:50). I always use whole grain therefore I sometimes use a little more water. I always have around 50 g of each in the fridge. When starting I add about 220 g flour and water to the rye starter and keep it for about 12 h at room temperature. I also add 100 g of flour and 50 g of water to the wheat starter and likewise keep it for 12 h at room temperature. At the same time I prepare a “Brühstück” which is 70 g of coarsely ground rye 35 g of linseed and 35 g of some other seed (sunflower, squash, etc) with 20 g of salt on which you pour 280 g of boiling water (50:100). You keep that for 12 h, too. After said 12 h you put the „Brühstück, 150 g of the wheat sourdough and 440 g of the rye sourdough together in the bowl of your kitchen machine (kmix in my case) add 300 g of rye flour and wheat flour each together with 300 g of water (lukewarm). Then you mix (speed setting 1 for the kmix) for 7 min and again 7 min with speed setting 2-3. Fill it in 1 or 2 weed baskets of appropriate size and keep it at room temperature for 1 h then into the fridge for another 10 to 12 h. Place a container with water in your oven. Preheat to 250 C. Put the bread into the oven. I use two weed baskets, then I do 5 min @250 C with fan, so that the bread seizes quickly and retains its shape. Then another 20 min @250 C without fan ( top and bottom heat). Then take out the container with the water and set the temperature to 190 C, the temperature will fall slowly. Keep it in the oven for another 40 min. Then take it out and let it cool down on a grill. If you put all the dough in one bigger weed basket, you need to keep it in the oven for an additional 20 min. The “Brühstück” makes sure that the bread will not get dry for several days.
    I only use organic whole grain flour, emmer or einkorn wheat and “Waldstaudenroggen” rye. These are very “old” grains because I do not like newer “inbred” sorts of grain. You may vary the rye/wheat ratio to your liking with more wheat you probably need a little less water.

    PS I always use a pizza stone when baking bread
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2020
  17. pechelman

    pechelman Acquaintance

    Contributor
    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2019
    Likes Received:
    54
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    Wow. Vielen Dank @mitochondrium !
    I've got a bit of work to do it looks like from this. Hopefully I can give this a go soon.
     

Share This Page