Steak

Discussion in 'Food and Drink' started by JK47, Nov 5, 2019.

  1. JK47

    JK47 The Beer Houdini

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    After seeing @Vtory's profile post regarding steak, maybe it's time to start a dedicated thread for different cuts, cooking methods, and species (Angus, Wagyu, etc).

    Charcoal, or pan fried in butter, then broiled are my go to methods, depending on mood and motivation. I always let the steak come up to room temperature or close to it, then freshly grind salt and pepper 5-10 minutes before it's time to cook, NEVER any rubs or other spices, I'm just not really a fan.

    I've started to experiment with dry aged steaks at home using the Umai film, with great success. This is a New York strip loin aged for 3 weeks.
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    Here is a Rib loin aged for 4 weeks, and I forgot to take pictures after butchering it.

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    The trimmed outer crust makes and excellent flavorful stew!!!

    Sorry no action shots or finished product this time around.
     
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  2. Vtory

    Vtory Illogical Spock

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    Wow I am about to pull the trigger!.. Thanks for the photos.

    Btw do you use a dedicated refrigerator to store umai-bagged meats? I'm worrying if strong smell does harm to other foods when used in the main refrigerator.
     
  3. JK47

    JK47 The Beer Houdini

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    I put them in me regular fridge, that's the beauty of the Umai bags, lets moisture out, and keeps odor at bay. It's all there on their site, not much to it at all, just patience. Tons of YT vids on the subject as well.

    You will need to shorten the cook time though, the lack of moisture will speed things up.

    Cheap beer enables me to enjoy other things in life, especially the volume I drink it.
    IMG_2545.jpeg

    More dry aged steak p0rn
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  4. Metro

    Metro Friend

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    A classic from 2014, originally published on the sadly departed website, The Awl.

    How To Cook A Fucking Steak
    by Alex Balk

    Go to the goddamn grocery and get steak. Yes, the grocery. A little ammonia is not going to kill you, you pussy. You want to be all fancy and grass-fed and environmentally conscious, go ahead, I don’t give a shit, just get a fucking steak. Ribeye is good. And, yes, bone-in. Schmuck. Take the steak home. Get a bigass frying pan and put the shit on the stove, cranking the heat up as far as that fucker will go. Take a shitload of salt—rocksalt, you dumb motherfucker, none of that fine-grained crap here—and toss it around the bottom of the pan. When the pan is hot as all fuck—it should scorch the shit out of your finger if you’re stupid enough to touch it—put the fucking steak on there. You can crack some pepper on the top of the steak as the bottom is searing, but don’t even talk to me about garlic or onion powder or COMPOUND FUCKING BUTTER, asshole. This is steak, all you fucking need is salt and pepper. After a bit (3 minutes for pink, 5 for cooked good), flip that shit over and do the same fucking thing you just did with the other side, i.e. sit on your ass and wait for your motherfucking steak to be ready, you useless assbag. When you’re done, sling that shit on a plate. Beringer’s 1996 Cabernet Sauvignon Napa Valley Private Reserve makes an absolutely delightful accompaniment, particularly if you’ve taken care to let it breathe a bit before quaffing. Also, make some fucking potatoes, because that’s what you eat with a fucking steak. God, sometimes I just want to smack the shit out of you.

    – Alex Balk – The Awl​
     
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  5. Cspirou

    Cspirou They call me Sparky

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    99% of the time my steaks are salt, pepper and rubbed with crushed garlic. The garlic is really key and I believe it's something they do for bistecca alla fiorentina in Italy. Although for me the influence comes from the vietnamese side where my dad needed garlic with all beef. No 10 ingredient rubs and no real marination.

    I've tried salting far ahead of time and I don't really like it. While it does distribute salt throughout the meat, I feel like it changes it more to a 'cured' taste. So I tend to salt just before cooking. For thick steaks (>2") I take it out for 2 hours at room temperature. Before you freak out, official restaurant guidelines say raw meat can stay out for up to 4 hours. For thinner steaks I would rather it stays cold so it doesn't overcook.

    My experimentation is usually after its cooked. Usually I add butter on top when it's still warm and melts all over it. Referenced in @Vtory post is an anchovy butter which will instantly convert any anchovy hater. And if you think anchovy doesn't go with beef, just read the ingredients list on A1 or Worchestirereere sauce. Also pho has fish sauce in it.

    Something cool I learned for grilled meats was a board dressing from Adam Perry Lang. Basically get a cutting board out and chop up parsley and whatever other aromatics along with garlic and salt. Add olive and red wine vinegar (or lemon juice) and get it all mixed just before the steak is done cooking and then allow the meat to rest right on the dressing on the cutting board. Then slice the steak and toss it a bit before serving.

    I did not know about that umai bag and it's definitely something I want to try.
     
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  6. crazychile

    crazychile Eastern Iowa's Spiciest Pepper

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    I put salt, pepper and fresh garlic on my steaks before cooking. Don't fucking use garlic powder, that shit turns into an acrid, bitter mess. I've watched many tutorials on how to cook a steak but I can't high-temp pan fry in the house since I'm in an old farmhouse that doesn't have a vent fan. The last time I tried that I smoked out the house and set off every fire detector, the cats went psycho and gave me the "you're a dumbass" look for the next 2 days.

    So I do that on a charcoal grill. Or if it's January and 20 below, I have a gas grille in an unheated outbuilding, where I pound down double IPAs while I tend the meats. (3 seems to be the sweet spot) Let rest after cooking in a sealed container for about 10 minutes and then eat.

    That anchovy butter sounds amazing....
     
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  7. supertransformingdhruv

    supertransformingdhruv Almost "Made"

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    My current favorite special occasion treatment for a steak is a bit of a variation on something I saw on bon appetit. It takes too much time & effort to do casually, so if i'm not trying to impress anyone I just pan fry thinner cuts.

    I season a thick ~2" ribeye with salt about an hour or two before cooking, then sear at high heat in a cast iron. I use just enough oil that nothing sticks, and rely on the fat caps to render into the pan to do most of the work. To this end, score the fat so that it releases faster and start cooking on the fattiest edges first. Once there's enough fat to cook with, I start flipping the steak. Experimenting with different timings on this now, but what's worked best so far is flipping every twoish minutes until there's a nice Maillard. Internal temp around 110, but after the first few times I just go by the crust.

    At this point I diverge from ba and take the steak out for a minute. Cool the pan from the sear temp to more medium heat. Load the pan with butter, pepper corns, and garlic, and just a hint of rosemary. I infuse the butter, but don't brown it, then baste the steak. Stop at desired final internal temp. I like to toss some olive oil in the pan with whatever's left of the basting butter, turn the heat back up a bit, and fry up some rosemary garlic potatoes + asparagus for balance.

    Pair with an IPA or sharper rye to cut through richness.

    This is the worst thread for 9:30 AM on a weekday. Now I'm hungry and I want steak. Also considering this whole anchovies thing, and if I should try introducing minced anchovy to my basting butter.
     
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  8. Vtory

    Vtory Illogical Spock

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    It seems that I am more open to rubs than the community average lol.
    I tend to use salt only for totl grade meats, add a little bit of pepper for higher meats, but like to use garlic power for lower grades (e.g. usda select) -- I'm not rich enough to have premium meats only for this hobby. And at least it worked when meats lack something.

    On top of that, I love to experiment a lot of unusual (or seemingly weird) stuffs as steak rubs. Here are some of such examples that worked for my taste: msg, instant (spicy) noodle soup powder, ground turmeric, etc. It's like EQing audio chain imho. For some low-fat cuts such as tenderloin, they really boosted and developed flavor. I don't use them for new york strips or ribeyes though.
     
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  9. crazychile

    crazychile Eastern Iowa's Spiciest Pepper

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    Interesting approach. I could see using creative rubs on sirloin, which varies in quality from shoe leather to pretty good. But at that point It's kinda like using expensive meat for BBQ, which kinda defeats the purpose of BBQ. I definitely use a more complex rub, (and much higher quantity) on BBQ, but I rarely use beef for that other than the occasional brisket, which I've largely sworn off due to the time commitment involved. And usually I'm still not completely happy with the results. So I usually stick with pork or chicken which is a lot more forgiving.
     
  10. Syzygy

    Syzygy Friend

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    @Vtory gives me an idea to use my Tikka Masala spice as a rub…it'll prolly never happen, since when I do eat steak* it's usually Ruth's Chris (and that's about 1-2/year). But it would make a nice rub I'm guessing.

    * I'm mostly-vegetarian for 3 years now. Looking forward to cooking turkey dinner though!
     
  11. yotacowboy

    yotacowboy McRibs Kind of Guy

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    2" thick NY Strip, cut in half width-wise for two portions: Sous vide, 125 for 2-3 hours with kosher or other coarse salt. Cast iron pan, ripping hot, 2 tablespoons canola oil, sear for 1 minute per side until B&D. Top with ground pepper and more salt.

    I grabbed some malted rice to try dry aging, but haven't yet. Anybody try that?

    Also, sirloin can be almost as good as prime rib if done sous vide for 24-48 hours, and using a paste/rub of fish sauce, Worcestershire, S&P, and fresh mushrooms processed in a blender. Finish the roast in a 450 degree oven for color until B&D.

    Edit: for those that want Peter Luger sides:

    2tbls butter, sweat a shallot, add 2 tbls flour, wisk for 1 minute, add 1/4 cup cream, wisk until smooth, add 1/4 cup parm, meanwhile microwave 1 lb baby spinach. add wilted spinach to bech, stir to combine, add 1 cup sliced leeks, add 1 tbls ea. fresh cracked black pepper, fresh ground nutmeg. simmer over lowest possible heat for 10 minutes.

    For paleo: break down 1 head cauli, roast @ 425 w/ SP and EVOO for 15 minutes. in a saucepan, sauté 1 onion sliced w/ 1/4 cup sherry until caramelized, deep mahogany. after 15 minutes add 1 cup shredded carrots, roasted cauli, to onions and toss. S&P to taste. heavy on cracked pepper!

    Non-paleo: replace cauli w/ roasted sliced yukon gold potatoes.
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2019
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